Surrey Muse Reading this Friday Oct 27

muse poster

I’m the book signing author at Surrey Muse this coming Friday

Here are the details . . .

Surrey Muse meets (5:30 – 8:30 pm) every Fourth Friday of each month except December.

Presenters
Three presenters (Author, Poet, Artist/Performer) use 20 minutes each. Each presentation is followed by 10 minutes of discussion/questions. A host cannot reduce/change time allocation. An online profile is posted at Surrey Muse web page for each presenter before the meeting. A Data Projector can be made available if needed. A microphone is not allowed. Photographs may be taken and/or videos may be made for our blog and Facebook pages. A permanent link will be added to Surrey Muse Sidebar in ‘Featured’ links for each presenter (please send yours if it’s not there). An event report (hopefully) will also be published. At this time, there is no honorarium for presenters.

CD/DVD/Book Signing
Another author/performer who has launched a book or a cd/dvd in the previous three months is invited to be available for Signing. The author/performer is introduced by the host to read for 7-10 minutes at the beginning of the meeting, and they will have a table to display/sign/sell any or all of their titles. This is an optional item of our program.

Refreshments
There can be two 10-minute breaks or one 15-minute break. A host can reduce the duration/number of breaks to make up for lost time.

Open Mic
35-40 minutes of Open Mic with 7 minutes for the Opener, and 5 minutes for each participant. A host can take no more than 5-7 minutes to make up for lost time. Begins with the Opener. Book Table provides the sign-up sheet. Open Mic presenters may be mentioned in event reports, may appear in photographs and videos, and may be on our People page. Bring your poems, short fiction, creative prose, art, songs.

Book Table
All Presenters, Hosts and Participants can place their books, CDs, DVDs and art for sale at the Book Table without any cost.

Events are free
Donations are welcome and much needed.

Venue
#405 – City Centre Library
10350 University Drive
Surrey, BC V3T 4B8
(604) 598-7420

Huzzah!

 

the muse

We’re in the last few days before the book launch, and truth be told I’m vibrating with excitement.

It’s also true that some unavoidable family stuff has come up,  so at least some of my attention and energy is directed that way too.

I am looking forward to a long long sleep on Sunday Oct 22.

 

Things That Will Mess Up Your Writing Process, Part Two

depression
Charcoal drawing by Chloe Cocking

Another thing that can mess up your writing process– if you let it– is squidgy boundaries. Many writers I know (myself included) are people-pleasing folk who have a hard time saying “No,” as in . . .

  • “No, I don’t want to go dog-walking with you, this is my writing time.”
  • “No, I don’t want to go out shopping with you on Sunday, because Sunday is one of of my writings days, I need that time to be organized for the upcoming week.”
  • “No, I don’t want to watch Netflix at the moment, I am writing.”
  • “No, I can’t sit on this or that committee for this or that arts organization, or volunteer to stuff envelopes or update your database, or, or, or, or or . . .”

If remarks like this came easy to me, I think I would have finished Blood Rain faster.

I have developed a script that I use to turn down the invitations I find most tempting– feel free to use or adapt it if it is useful to you:

“I’m sorry, I am in recovery from being a Woman-Who-Does-Too-Much. Asking me for ____________ is like a kind of crack for me, so I must decline your invitation. Thank you for understanding”. 

Things that will mess up your writing process, Part One

aaron-burden-189321
Photo created by Aaron Burden, used under a CC licence.

My high school creative writing teacher gave the class a lecture one time about the two types of writing processes, “classical” and “romantic”.

He advised that writers with a classical process are highly structured, create detailed outlines, and develop their plots and characters fully before they start drafting.

He opined further that writers with a romantic process, write (only) when the spirit moves them. They often draft scenes outside of chronological order. Their characters and plots develop organically, sometimes in directions the writer did not anticipate.

This bit of advice was then (and is now) horseshit.

Every writer I know uses some combination of classical and romantic elements.**

What’s more, having that dichotomy in mind messed up my process. I felt like I was doing it “wrong”, which contributed to long periods of not writing.

From my perspective, any writer’s process can be like a frozen soap bubble- something lovely to look at, but also something that can be easily destroyed by a probing finger or overheated breathing.

**More on this in a future post